Gamer Unsupervised: Ideas and Lessons Your Gamer May be Learning While Nobody's Watching | PT 1: Rage

Hi families.  It’s time to have a talk.  

At Ukatsu, we LOVE our video games.  It’s the enjoyment for all types of games and competitive esports that keeps things fun while working here, but that doesn't mean it’s all smiles and laughs in our industry.  

For any gamer that connects to the Internet, it doesn’t take very long to experience the good, the bad, and the ugly culture associated with playing video games and connecting to social media. 

That’s why in this mini blog-series, we at Ukatsu are shedding light upon the not-so-positive themes gamers, including your children, hear and say on a regular basis.  Besides a healthy balance between fun and fitness, one of the greatest perks for any child attending Ukatsu is the supervision and empathy, as well as forgiveness when we have deeper conversations with your kids as to why the things they say or do might not be the smartest choice.

The content you see within this blog series may contain mature themes and language.  It’s important for us to leave no theme or phrase uncensored. By actively approaching and addressing our concerns, we can create a better community for all gamers.  Examples of topics we’ll be covering in this series include Depression, Anxiety, Respect and Sportsmanship, Sexism, and more.  

Our first subject in our series covers a not-so-new theme: Rage

Here’s an example of what we mean, expressed in recently trending “Rage Compilation” videos you’ll find on YouTube.



Here’s the definition of rage: 

Rage : (n.)  violent, uncontrollable anger 

For YouTubers and online personalities, outrage can be a big boon for attracting viewers to click and watch their content.  

One of League of Legends most popular streamers, Tyler1. He’s big into rage, but that’s his online character. In actuality, we hear he’s a really sweet guy. Talk to your kids about real life and online personas.

One of League of Legends most popular streamers, Tyler1. He’s big into rage, but that’s his online character. In actuality, we hear he’s a really sweet guy. Talk to your kids about real life and online personas.

Where the issue lies, however, is when children don’t understand the difference between raging for and audience and raging as a normal behaviour when things don’t quite work out the way they intended it to. 

Just like a lot of the parents at Ukatsu, we’ve had to replace a few smashed controllers, headsets and other peripherals thanks to the glorification of rage. 

We’ve seen the adverse effects of imitating a popular gamer’s tantrums on our kids at Ukatsu.  Though we don’t have any scientific research (yet!) from our end, we’ve noticed that “practicing” rage can lead to: 

  • Depression when expectations aren’t met in competition

  • Self inflicted harm and harm to those around the gamer

  • Chronic anger management problems

  • Difficulty making friends who may find their raging annoying or overwhelming

At Ukatsu, we’ve seen the substantial impact that YouTube Videos, television shows, and Social Media has on child behaviour.  We’ve also seen first hand what bringing a child from a toxic unsupervised gaming environment to a positive one can do both in the short and long term development of a child. 

A new 2019 game named Rage 2. Fun game, no doubt, but can you see why we might have to have that talk about games vs. reality?

A new 2019 game named Rage 2. Fun game, no doubt, but can you see why we might have to have that talk about games vs. reality?

A takeaway from this short blog?  Talk to your children about rage.  Understand the difference between entertainment and reality (after all who doesn’t remember the lovable Homer Simpson and his rage induced comedy?).  

You may be wondering, “Does my child really feel or say these things?” And the answer is unfortunately: probably.  

For us working with your children at Ukatsu, we’ve noticed that most of the kids have LEARNED how to rage from an outside influence, rather than a trait they were born with.  Set the tone now, and have the conversation at home often, because you can bet we’re having that conversation with your kids at Ukatsu.